Based on current information, SICKLE CELL DISEASE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA recommends that people with sickle cell disease receive COVID-19 vaccination.

SCD & COVID-19

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lists sickle cell disease (SCD) as one of the populations vulnerable to severe COVID-19. 

Supporters of Families with SCDVaccine Information
SICKLE CELL & COVID 19

WHAT TO KNOW

 

CDC ON SICKLE CELL AND COVID-19

People of any age with Sickle Cell Disease are more likely to get severely ill from COVID-19. COVID-19 vaccines (initial doses and boosters) and preventive measures for COVID-19 are important, especially if you are older or have multiple or severe health conditions including those on this list.

Approved and authorized COVID-19 vaccines (initial doses and boosters) are safe and effective and should be administered to people at higher risk including people with underlying medical conditions. Learn more about COVID-19 vaccines for people with underlying medical conditions.

Some immunocompromised people may be eligible for a COVID-19 additional primary dose.

This list does not include all possible conditions that place you at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19. If you have a condition not included here, talk to your doctor about how best to manage your condition and protect yourself from COVID-19.

HEMOGLOBIN BLOOD DISORDERS, SCD

Having hemoglobin blood disorders like sickle cell disease (SCD) or thalassemia can make you more likely to get severely ill from COVID-19. Click here for more information.

 

iNFECTIONS AND SICKLE CELL DISEASE

Common illnesses, like the flu, can quickly become dangerous for a person with sickle cell disease. The best defense is to take simple steps to help prevent infections.

Hand Washing

Washing your hands is one of the best ways to help prevent getting an infection. People with sickle cell disease, their family, and other caretakers should wash their hands with soap and clean water many times each day. If you don’t have soap and water, you can use gel hand cleaners with alcohol in them. Wash hands before eating and making food. Wash them after using the bathroom; blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing; shaking hands; touching people or things that can carry germs. 

Food Safety

Bacteria, called salmonella, in some foods can be especially harmful to children with sickle cell disease. How to stay safe when cooking and eating:

  • Wash hands, cutting boards, counters, knives, and other utensils after they touch uncooked foods.
  • Wash vegetables and fruit well before eating them.
  • Cook meat until it’s well done. The juices should run clear and there should be no pink inside.
  • Do not eat raw or undercooked eggs. Raw eggs might be hiding in homemade hollandaise sauce, caesar and other homemade salad dressings, tiramisu, homemade ice cream, homemade mayonnaise, cookie dough, and frostings.
  • Do not eat raw or unpasteurized milk or other dairy products (cheeses). Make sure these foods have a label that says they are “pasteurized.”

Source: Continue reading this article on the CDC website

 

 

Learn About OUr Partner: Supporters of Families with sickle cell disease

Supporters of Families with Sickle Cell Disease (Supporters) is a community-based Oklahoma nonprofit organization that has assisted families living with sickle cell diseases since 2004. We are an IRS 501(c)(3) designated nonprofit agency. Supporters is the only grassroots family support and advocacy organization in Oklahoma that serves as a center of contact and referral to community resources to assist individuals with sickle cell and related diseases who is contracted with the Oklahoma Health Care Authority.

Supporters serve as the state lead SCDAA HRSA Newborn Screening program for the state of Oklahoma.

Supporters promotes self-care management, testing, education, research and development, and economic self-sufficiency as key approaches to empowerment and effective management of sickle cell disease. Our vision is to break the cycle of the disease by increasing self-efficacy and improving the overall quality of life for children, adults and families living with sickle cell diseases in Oklahoma.

Source: Supporters of Families With Sickle Cell Disease

 

FACTS & RESOURCES

SICKLE CELL DISEASE

People With Sickle Cell At Higher Risk for Severe COVID-19

People with sickle cell disease who have a COVID-19 infection are more likely to be hospitalized and to require intensive level care (ICU) in the hospital. They are also more likely to die from COVID-19 than people without sickle cell disease.

One study followed 178 people with sickle cell anemia and COVID-19 infection. The average age of people in the study was less than 40 years old. Sixty-nine percent of people needed to be treated in a hospital, and 7% of them died.

Source: CDC

what should i do if think i might have covid-19?

Get a COVID-19 test.

Call your health care provider if you develop symptoms that could be consistent with COVID-19.

Most vaccinated people have mild illness and can recover at home. If you think you have COVID-19 and have symptoms of illness, you should get tested.

If you have severe symptoms, seek emergency medical care right away by calling 911. Call ahead to the emergency department and tell the operator that you may have COVID-19.

Learn more about COVID-19 and what to do if you get sick.

Source: CDC

SICKLE CELL Disease

More Resources

Webinar: Sickle Cell Disease and COVID-19: Navigating Change (LINK)

Connect with SUPPORTERS of FAMILIES WITH SICKLE CELL DISASE ON FACEBOOK. (LINK)